Dr. Althea Bauernschmidt

Dr. Bauernschmidt after her dissertation defense

Dr. Althea Bauernschmidt grew up in Indianapolis, Indiana. She went to college at Indiana University where she earned a B.S. in Psychology, a B.A. in Linguistics, and minored in Anthropology. As an undergraduate she worked in the Speech Research Lab (SRL) and for the Indiana Consortium for Mental Health Services Research. In the SRL she completed her honors thesis which investigated how working memory training affects implicit learning - a type of memory often recruited in speech comprehension. Althea continued to study memory as a graduate student at Purdue University working with Jeffrey D. Karpicke. Her master's thesis examined how prospective memory - the ability to remember to do something in the future - might be recruited during problem solving. Her dissertation focused on how interest may guide, or misguide, students' ability to monitor and control their studying. A common theme throughout her research is the application of memory theory to other domains of cognition and to education.

When she is not teaching or in the lab, Dr. Bauernschmidt enjoys cooking, knitting, brewing beer and wine, making cheese, walking her dog, digging up the garden, and generally DIY-ing it.


Education

Ph.D., Psychology, Purdue University, 2013

Dissertation: Interest as a Cue for Metacognitive Control

M.S., Psychology, Purdue University 2010

Thesis: Analogical Problem Solving and Prospective Memory

 

B.S., Psychology, Indiana University, 2008

Thesis: Working Memory Training and Implicit Learning

B.A., Linguistics, Indiana University, 2008

Minor: Anthropology

 

Courses Taught

Spring 2015

PSYC 101 - Introduction to Psychology

A beginning course in the social and natural science areas of psychology. Research methods, quantitative methods and history are also introduced. 3 credits.

PSYC 422 - Cognitive Psychology

How do we think, and how can our thoughts processes be improved? The course will deal with contemporary approaches to the study of higher mental processes, with an emphasis on information processing. Topics will include memory, language, cognitive skills, reasoning, concept learning and problem solving. Theories and research will be considered, along with applications to everyday life. 3 credits.

PSYC 302 - Laboratory in Human Memory and Cognition

This laboratory course will involve and in-depth exploration of topics in human memory and cognition. Students will engage in supervised research on topics in human memory and cognition. 3 credits.

Previous Courses 

Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 101), St. Bonaventure University, Fall 2014

Special Topics: Memory (PSY 420), St. Bonaventure University, Fall 2014

Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 101), St. Bonaventure University, Spring 2014

Laboratory in Human Memory and Cognition (PSYC 302), St. Bonaventure University, Spring 2014

Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 101), St. Bonaventure University, Fall 2013

Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 422), St. Bonaventure University, Fall 2013

Introductory Psychology, Purdue University, Summer 2011

Cognitive Psychology, Purdue University, Summer 2013

 

Publications

Karpicke, J. D., & Bauernschmidt, A. (2011). Spaced Retrieval: Absolute Spacing Enhances Learning Regardless of Relative Spacing. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 37(5), 1250-1257.

Conway, C. M., Bauernschmidt, A., Huang, S. S., & Pisoni, D.B. (2010). Implicit statistical learning in language processing: Word predictability is the key. Cognition, 114, 356-371.

Technical Reports/Progress Reports

Bauernschmidt, A., Conway, C. M., Pisoni, D. (2008). Working Memory Training and Implicit Learning. In Research on Spoken Language Processing Progress Report No. 29. Bloomington, IN: Speech Research Laboratory, Indiana University.

Conway, C. M., Bauernschmidt, A., Huang, S. S., Pisoni, D. (2008). The Role of Implicit Learning in Spoken Language Processing: Word Predictability is the Key. In Research on Spoken Language Processing Progress Report No. 29. Bloomington, IN: Speech Research Laboratory, Indiana University.

Bauernschmidt, A. & Loebach, J.L. (2007). Developing coding schemes for assessing errors in open-set speech recognition and environmental sound identification. In Research on Spoken Language Processing Progress Report No. 28. Bloomington, IN: Speech Research Laboratory, Indiana University.

Loebach, J.L., Bent, T. & Bauernschmidt, A. (2007). Multiple routes to perceptual learning. In Research on Spoken Language Processing Progress Report No. 28. Bloomington, IN: Speech Research Laboratory, Indiana University.

Awards

Leo F. Keenan Jr. Faculty Appreciation Award, St. Bonaventure, 2015

Presented to a faculty member who most exemplifies a genuine commitment to human betterment through the acquisition of knowledge, who is guided in daily life by a deep sensitivity and gentle understanding of differences, and who reflects an enduring optimism in relationships with students.

David A. Santogrossi Graduate Instructor Award, Purdue University, 2012

Sigma Xi Graduate Student REsearch award, purdue university, 2012

Departmental award for graduate research innovation, purdue university, 2011